How to Tell a Story With Video in Social Media

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So, your company has a Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube account, but is there a common message that runs through all of your social media pages? How do you go about telling this story with video in social media?

In the video world, story is what sets film apart from a video.   In video, there is a story in what is said and a story in what is shown on screen.  There is a huge difference between filmmaking and capturing video.  Video is what you see when you see people at their child’s dance recital using their iPads to capture the moment. A filmmaker can take that same child’s dance recital and shoot it in a way that tells a story, creating a video that you would want to watch whether your child was in the recital or not.   To say it another way, videography is about capturing reality and filmmaking is about adding the element of fantasy.  If you want to tell a story, you need to find someone who knows the difference between video and filmmaking.  The next step is to figure out what videos you are going to start with.

A company introduction video is a type of video that works well on the company’s website to introduce new visitors to the company.  After adding the video to your company’s website, it should then be rolled out to all of the social media sites, starting with YouTube and adding it to other sites from there.  This video helps build the morale of employees and investors by giving them a message that they can all stand beside.  It focuses on what the company is doing.   It can also help you attract new talent.    Remember, you have 15 seconds to get their attention, no matter the audience.

Even brands that don’t usually advertise have started to find value in social media Boeing is a good example of this.  The average person can’t purchase anything from Boeing, but this doesn’t stop Boeing from making sure that they have a strong presence on Twitter and YouTube.  They know that the people in their target audience work at companies that Boeing would like to partner with. They also realize that having company brand through social media is important because the companies that they work with and the type of products they create places them in the news.  They know that it is better for them to control the message now while everything is good then to try to do damage control later when there is a problem in the news.  If you build a relationship with consumers in the good times, they will be more likely to stick with you in the tough times.  Social media provides a great opportunity to do this.  It is all about relationships – people do business with those they know, like, and trust.  Video is a great way to build rapport and increase trust.

Now that you have a video, the next step is a social media plan.  The video should be on YouTube.  Embed that video to your company’s website or consider using a service like Bright Cove to host your videos.  Once you’ve done those steps, share your videos via Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.  Pinterest continues to grow in popularity and now allows you to create a business account to promote content.   In August of 2012, Pinterest passed Yahoo in monthly traffic.

Google is indexing content on Pinterest, which means that adding video to the site would have significant SEO benefits.   You can share video on Pinterest just like you can pictures.  Inside of Pinterest, create a board, titles, and pin description that includes the word ‘video’.  Make sure that you follow SEO standards and be a part of the conversation.  How will your company tell a story that starts a conversation?

About the Author:

Jayson Duncan

This monthly Social Media and Video column is contributed by Jayson Duncan. Jayson is an Orange County, California filmmaker and owner of the video production company Miller Farm Media. In 2003, Jayson began using video to help others tell their stories through his video production company, Miller Farm Media. He has created videos for Fortune 50 companies. In his spare time Jayson enjoys playing his guitar, song writing, and spending time with his wife, Gretchin.

Jayson Duncan
This monthly Social Media and Video column is contributed by Jayson Duncan. Jayson is an Orange County, California filmmaker and owner of the video production company Miller Farm Media. In 2003, Jayson began using video to help others tell their stories through his video production company, Miller Farm Media. He has created videos for Fortune 50 companies. In his spare time Jayson enjoys playing his guitar, song writing, and spending time with his wife, Gretchin.
Jayson Duncan
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  1. [...] When you create a humorous, interesting, thought-provoking, or problem solving video, people will share it. When you ignore the rules of storytelling, people tend to ignore your video. Good visual storytelling is about sequence and structure. Sure, rules are meant to be broken, but you need to know the rules before you break them. Here’s an important rule to know: the difference between filmmaking and videography is very important. Videography is pointing the camera at something as it is happening. Filmmaking is adding an element of fantasy. We created a simple video of a basketball game to illustrate this point of the difference between film making and video. Which one would you rather watch? The second one, right? Why? Because it tells a better story! They are both show the same exact event, but the second one has added the element of fantasy through the way it’s been shot. I was once in a meeting where the CEO of a company that had a huge marketing budget said, “We don’t need all of this,” meaning that he didn’t feel it was necessary to for his video to tell a story. After reading the proposal, he stated, “My wife has an iPad. She can shoot the video.” He didn’t understand the difference between videography and filmmaking. He didn’t understand the importance of telling a story. [...]

  2. […] used to explain ideas or concepts, usually for  products, services or a business.   This type of video is able to explain something faster than text or other presentation forms, saving time for the  audience and for the company that created the video.   Most people are […]

  3. […] Generation Y (also known as the Millennial Generation):  cares more about image than value.  They want products that convey and reward their success and personal achievement.  They are more likely to buy a popular product, or any product, simply because it’s visually appealing.  This means, when it comes to video, the product needs to look good and sound good.  It needs to give them a sense of pride of ownership.  While Generation Y is interested in social issues, they are less likely to make a buying decision based on those issues.    They are social media savvy and they think that brands don’t do social media correctly.   Your work is cut out for you if you want to create a video that will engage them emotionally and also be something that they will share.  This goes back to the idea of telling a better story. […]

  4. […] When you create a humorous, interesting, thought-provoking, or problem solving video, people will share it. When you ignore the rules of storytelling, people tend to ignore your video. Good visual storytelling is about sequence and structure. Sure, rules are meant to be broken, but you need to know the rules before you break them. Here’s an important rule to know: the difference between filmmaking and videography is very important. Videography is pointing the camera at something as it is happening. Filmmaking is adding an element of fantasy. We created a simple video of a basketball game to illustrate this point of the difference between film making and video. Which one would you rather watch? The second one, right? Why? Because it tells a better story! They are both show the same exact event, but the second one has added the element of fantasy through the way it’s been shot. I was once in a meeting where the CEO of a company that had a huge marketing budget said, “We don’t need all of this,” meaning that he didn’t feel it was necessary to for his video to tell a story. After reading the proposal, he stated, “My wife has an iPad. She can shoot the video.” He didn’t understand the difference between videography and filmmaking. He didn’t understand the importance of telling a story. […]

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