How Should I Utilize LinkedIn Differently than Twitter?

Many of my LinkedIn contacts have started sending me emails asking me to “follow” them on Twitter, so I thought this was a good time to take a look at what you should be doing differently on each site.Let’s start with LinkedIn.  The demographic here is 40 million professionals with large incomes.  I remember reading on the official site that the average income of a LinkedIn member was near six-figure.  But LinkedIn is also very strict on privacy and spamming, and there are many restrictions as to how many connections you can have, groups you can join, et. al.  LinkedIn is not a garden that you can freely roam about and do as you wish; you need to adapt yourself to its environment in order to thrive.

Twitter, on the other hand, while having what I believe a similar demographic to LinkedIn at this point, probably still only has about 15 million members (I have yet to see the official number, would love your comment if you know).  But in comparison, with the exception of the limit of adding 1,000 followers per day, is a place for free-thinkers to thrive and for anyone to do as you wish.  That being said, what you can do on Twitter is inherently limited to 140-character tweets.

Regardless of your professional objective, it makes sense to have a presence on both sites customized for each platform.  How to customize?

In LinkedIn you should be emphasizing your own professional brand, establishing credibility, and be primarily using it to socially network with other professionals for whatever your objective might be.  CONNECT ON LINKEDIN.

Twitter should be about building out your brand and special subject matter expertise and leading people somewhere else, whether it be to your website or blog or even to your LinkedIn and/or Facebook profile. GAIN MINDSHARE ON TWITTER.

This subject could be a topic for a much longer post, but hopefully this will provide you some quick and easy-to-understand insight.

About the Author:

Neal Schaffer, Founder and Editor-In-Chief

The Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Maximize Social Business, Neal Schaffer is a leader in helping businesses and professional strategically maximize their use of social media. Neal is the author of three social media books, including the recently published definitive social media strategy book Maximize Your Social. Forbes lists him as a Top 35 Social Media Power Influencer and AdAge lists his blog, Maximize Social Business (formerly known as Windmill Networking), as a top 100 global marketing blog. Neal provides social media strategy consulting and coaching, having worked with Fortune 500 companies and a Grammy-award winning musician. He has presented worldwide on social media at more than 150 events and also teaches social media marketing at Rutgers University. +Neal Schaffer

Neal Schaffer
The Founder and Editor-In-Chief of Maximize Social Business, Neal Schaffer is a leader in helping businesses and professional strategically maximize their use of social media. Neal is the author of three social media books, including the recently published definitive social media strategy book Maximize Your Social. Forbes lists him as a Top 35 Social Media Power Influencer and AdAge lists his blog, Maximize Social Business (formerly known as Windmill Networking), as a top 100 global marketing blog. Neal provides social media strategy consulting and coaching, having worked with Fortune 500 companies and a Grammy-award winning musician. He has presented worldwide on social media at more than 150 events and also teaches social media marketing at Rutgers University. +Neal Schaffer
Neal Schaffer
PeopleLinx

Comments

  1. Neal Schaffer says

    Thank you Elyse! I try to be pretty thorough in my blog posts, so I will work on expanding my thoughts in future posts, but hopefully this is enough to get people thinking on how each social networking site needs to be used differently.

  2. says

    “Connect on LinkedIn. Gain mindshare on Twitter.” That’s the best summary I’ve seen about how to use these very different social networks.

  3. says

    “Connect on LinkedIn. Gain mindshare on Twitter.” That’s the best summary I’ve seen about how to use these very different social networks.

  4. Sarang Brahme says

    I think the biggest difference is (which is also summarized well in the end) – Linkedin is professional networking VS Twitter (even FB) is social networking.

    It’s the basic purpose of joining these two networks is different; however for sourcing candidates – it’s the same. But also, the way you find, connect and engage your potential leads is very different.

  5. Sarang Brahme says

    I think the biggest difference is (which is also summarized well in the end) – Linkedin is professional networking VS Twitter (even FB) is social networking.

    It’s the basic purpose of joining these two networks is different; however for sourcing candidates – it’s the same. But also, the way you find, connect and engage your potential leads is very different.

  6. Neal Schaffer says

    Thanks for your contribution Sarang! That’s another good way of differentiating the two sites, professional vs. social, at least in their environment.

  7. Neal Schaffer says

    Thank you Elyse! I try to be pretty thorough in my blog posts, so I will work on expanding my thoughts in future posts, but hopefully this is enough to get people thinking on how each social networking site needs to be used differently.

  8. Neal Schaffer says

    Thanks for your contribution Sarang! That’s another good way of differentiating the two sites, professional vs. social, at least in their environment.

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